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What is Growth Mindset in the Workplace?

What is Growth Mindset in the Workplace?

“Be the change you want to see in the world” is a quote by Mahatma Gandhi and a newfound principle to many in the workplace.

In a progressive industrial and technical world, company survival is dependent mainly on forward-thinking leadership and setting the pace for the future to prevent the risk of becoming obsolete.

In July 2021, Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson portrayed their ambitious growth mindset and the essence of agility by going to space for the first time to learn more about the universe and find the next best thing to expand their business.

In its simplest terms, a growth mindset means seeing a chance to grow.

A company’s long-term survival is heavily dependent on being open-minded and welcoming innovative thinking. Blackberry was a domineering mobile gadget company in the early 2000s. Still, due to the lack of a growth mindset, it failed to maintain its competing aspects losing all dominant presence.

This article explores the concept of growth mindset, how it applies in the contemporary world, and why it is essential because this is the change we want to see and value in corporate environments.   

Fixed and Growth Mindset

An individual with a growth mindset understands that hard work and excellence come from learning through mistakes and gaining feedback from others to help enhance talent, skills, abilities, and personality. 

Individuals with a fixed mindset feel that their core characteristics, such as intelligence, talents, and abilities, are unchangeable and rigid over time. 

Professor Carol Dweck is a pioneer on growth mindset and shares that it is the most efficient method for helping people raise their self-efficacy, overcome their fear of failure, and believe in their ability to become competent in the future. 

People who have a growth mindset have more self-efficacy in achieving their goals, according to research. The Growth Mindset Institute has identified eight basic mental models that will cause people to have a fixed mindset.

These eight mental models are known as fixed mindset triggers because they frequently induce people to have a fixed mentality response. A fixed mindset trigger is a mental pattern that leads to bad habits, including procrastination, resistance, and giving up. 

The eight mental models are mindset beliefs, high effort, challenges, setbacks, success of others, comfort zone, feedback, and grit.

A growth mentality is essential for success in today’s competitive corporate world. Companies must adapt to changing circumstances, learn from mistakes, and believe that each employee has more potential for success.

How Growth Mindset Impact Organizations Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic

A growth mindset is one of the Agile PeopleOps Framework™ Manifesto.

Many organizations are dealing with the economic downturn caused by the pandemic (dubbed the “COVID-19 shock”) as the world continues to live in fear. Surviving these unprecedented times will require essential lifestyle changes to combat infections and rethinking how we do business.

The traditional formulas for success no longer apply in the new normal. Instead, adapting and growing in the face of adversity will be the key to triumphantly overcome the COVID-19 shock.

Keeping in mind: With change comes growth.  

Let us understand the organizations that adopt a growth mindset.

Microsoft Growth Mindset

According to The Adecco Group, one of the biggest companies in the world, Microsoft, has adopted the “Growth Mindset Culture.”

In 2014, when Mr. Satya Nadella became the CEO of Microsoft, he recognized that the company had become siloed, and the divisions were competing with one another. Bureaucracy and internal politics were impeding innovation and teamwork. He realized that change was the need of the hour for growth and sustainability.

The company’s stock price is now five times higher than when Mr. Nadella took over, and Microsoft’s market capitalization has surpassed one trillion dollars.

Microsoft has become the go-to “equipment”/ software used in various organizations during these “COVID times” as many businesses conduct work-from-home opportunities to which Microsoft so vastly caters.

Amazon Growth Mindset

Amazon was among the earliest online retailers, starting their business almost 14 years ago, offering the ability to buy online (a new concept at the time) in a new market: the internet.

Today the company has multiplied in size and respectfully in business, almost tripling revenue, becoming one of the world’s successful online stores/organizations to date. So how did they do it? 

By applying the growth mindset, the company was better able to assess risks and collect data (specifically, how to reach optimal customer satisfaction) to inform the next step, thus, creating an agile operating model. 

Amazon embraced strategic planning that boosted revenue and provided employee growth (opportunity for workers/employees to grow by working themselves up the hierarchy levels).

With COVID 19 dominating presence, this business will continue to flourish as its ideals align with how our world has significantly changed. The company is in the center stage today with more and more people buying online than physically wanting or even stepping outside. 

“If you decide that you are going to do only the things you know are going to work, you’re going to leave a lot of opportunity on the table.”

Jeff Bezos; Founder & Former CEO of Amazon

Growth Mindset: The Future of Work in Human Capital Management

According to a PwC survey, 66.7% of employees in the human resource workforce are unprepared for the changes ahead. Alarming, indeed!

The business world is still recuperating from the COVID-19 pandemic. During these challenging times, People Operations must find solutions to how organizations can positively impact the workplace and the workforce.

On the brighter side, People Operations trends evolve and transform the way we work as technology advances. The role of People Operations professionals is evolving to Strategic Practitioners, Employee Architects, Experience Designers, and Coaches. 

People Operations professionals must develop a growth mindset from the practice level down to the academic level to drive a holistic change in organizational strategy, structures, and processes. The essence is to deliver user-centric value and human experience to the employees.

By cultivating a growth mindset, the practitioners can embark on a continuous learning journey to innovate new ways to elevate the human experience within organizations and external stakeholders (including candidates). This, in turn, will enable them to make significant contributions to organizational sustainability and success.

Initially, HR transformation aimed to make HR processes more efficient at a clerical and administrative level. However, in today’s new era, HR is taking a backseat, and People Operations occupies the driver’s seat.

The growth mindset can stimulate People Operations practitioners to envision the big systemic picture of organizations and serve as constructive Change Catalysts.

Stimulating Growth Mindset at Individual and Organization Levels

Growth as a mind-related aspect is often not stimulated enough and gives the illusion that an individual has reached her peak while a lot of change can still occur.

The Growth Mindset theory then becomes operational by encouraging the stimulation of the mind through learning and developing skills that will create advancements for personal and career growth. In organizations, individuals with a Growth Mindset are an asset and valued because they represent the value of hard work and dedication.

Organizations can

  • Induce learning by sponsoring the latest learning and development seminars that train employees to upskill
  • Make room for mistakes in the organization to learn through trial and error and allocate time to improve on the mistakes made to avoid repetition in the future. 
  • Foster team collaboration from all departments in the organization as a way for teams to learn from each other
  • Create a culture of “open communication and feedback” where employees can share their concerns, ideas, and solutions for different areas of improvement.
  • Challenge employees to get them out of their comfort zones by pushing them towards organizational and personal goals.

A growth mindset can be stimulated at an individual level through introspection, habituating change, focusing on the process, not the result, and seeking learning opportunities.

Organizations benefit from stimulating innovative thinking. It enhances motivation and cognitive growth, fosters positive work relationships, and boosts performance mainly because employees become eager to take risks and pursue more meaningful goals.

REFERENCES

https://cezannehr.com/hr-blog/2019/05/why-your-employees-need-a-growth-mindset/

https://verbbrands.com/news/thoughts/amazon-founder-and-ceo-jeff-bezos-gives-us-6-business-lessons-to-learn-from/

https://www.adeccogroup.com/future-of-work/latest-insights/what-can-we-learn-from-microsofts-growth-mindset-culture/

https://www.psychologytoday.com/za/blog/click-here-happiness/201904/15-ways-build-growth-mindset

Yeager, D. S., & Dweck, C. S. (2020). What can be learned from growth mindset controversies. American Psychologist, 75(9), 1-16

Research

Agile PeopleOps Research-APF™

Agile PeopleOps Research team is conducting a Global Research “Learnings from COVID-19″ for the HR community.

How Leaders, Managers and Coaches from HR & PeopleOps function who were at the forefront responded to the pandemic, and how they are shaping the organizations and the future of work.

The purpose of this research is to collect and generate insights on:

  • Common challenges
  • Organizations’ response to the pandemic, and
  • How organizations are planning for a post-pandemic world to create the new normal

APF™ Research team sets aside 30-40 minutes with you to have a reflective conversation (you can opt to keep it anonymous) and map your personal experiences with collective themes to create a comprehensive report.

To participate and receive detailed trends report, click here https://bit.ly/34fhWzw. One of our Agile PeopleOps Research team members will coordinate with you for further steps.

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Tenets of Agile PeopleOps Framework™

Tenets of Agile PeopleOps Framework™ (APF™), a unified and dynamic methodology developed by Agile PeopleOps, takes People Operations (traditionally referred to as Human Resources / HR) to the next level – transforming traditional HR to Agile PeopleOps practices, thus giving an agile plus human experience edge in today’s disruptive business world.

To achieve sustainability and competitive edge during these unprecedented times, organizations need to adopt paradigms of vision, the uncertainty of vision, the uncertainty of understanding, complexity, and agility.

This is commendable when C-Suite, Leadership Teams, and People Operations (HR) practitioners adopt Agility PeopleOps Framework ™ (APF ™) and cultivate versatility and human-centric practices.

  • Growth mindset (the zeal to continuously learn & improve to achieve mastery)
  • Human-centric approach (thinking from the lens of candidates & employees, and fusing both empathy & rationality)
  • Transcultural competence (the ability to address cultural differences and dilemmas by moving away from ethnocentrism and believing in the genius of ‘and’)
  • Human Effectiveness Indicators (Measures to assess the effectiveness of performance of individuals / teams)

APF™ methodology is a critical enabler for the C-suite, leaders, and practitioners to take a stepwise approach to build agile organizations and drive agility in people operations and business.

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Coronavirus Global Impact and Response

Coranavirus causes g;obal imapct and response over business

The Infographic “Coronavirus Global Impact and Response” provides a high-level overview of:

The PDF version of the Infographic can be downloaded here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=14OVtllbbje7BOVoxBkzRHd5_FNR32MQl

APF-SM

The HR Manager as a PeopleOps Scrum Master

The PeopleOps Scrum Master (PSM), aka HR Manager, is an individual with diverse stances (for example, facilitator, servant leader, coach, change agent) as shown in the image.

Different stances and situations call different stances, and PeopleOps Scrum Master needs to know when and how to apply them.

This post explicates a real-time situation and the stances of PeopleOps Scrum Master that a Head HR fulfilled, and serves as an inspiration for today’s HR Manager who is keen to foster agility and human experience at the workplace.

Situation Overview 

The Head HR was associated with a company that specializes in the ready-to-move workspaces and interiors segment.

Prior to his joining, the company’s human resources department had minimal systems, processes, and procedures for many years.

The industry trends and the changing role of HR deemed the company’s management to redefine their HR function.

The Head HR was recruited and was accountable for organizational development and change management. 

Post joining, one of the change initiatives the Head HR proposed was to conduct an ‘external audit’.

To initiate the same, she examined the employees’ files and was shocked that 

  • hard copy files of some employees were missing 
  • important documents like mark sheets and experience letters of some employees were missing 
  • few files were torn and disorganized
  • most of the files didn’t have increment letters, and rewards & incentives documents 

The HR team (Head HR & Recruiter operating from headquarters, and HR Executive operating from a different state) had only 20 days left to organize all the 135 employees’ files.

The recruiter was overloaded to meet the priority needs and other priorities of the HR executive for about 10 days.

Action Plan 

The Head HR prepared the following action plan: 

  • Get all the files from different offices to the headquarters (within 5 days from the date the process begins)
  • Organize logistics for the HR Executive to come down to the headquarters. Ensure the processes in the location are not impacted in the absence of HR Executive (10 days from the date the process begins) 
  • For the files with missing documents, ensure the employees’ give the documents to Head HR within 7 days 
  • For the files with missing hard copy documents, search for soft copies in company’s repository. If unavailable, take the help of employees to create new files 
  • Prepare new set of files for those that were torn and disorganized 
  • Partner with finance team and employees to get all the increment letters, and add them to the files 

The Head HR as a PeopleOps Scrum Master 

Change Agent and Servant Leader 

  • The PeopleOps Scrum Master (aka Head HR) very well understood that her team had other priorities to fulfill before they could join hands with her in this priority project. She very well elicited Agile PeopleOps Framework™ values like respect, commitment and adaptability. 
  • She didn’t wait for them to complete their work. Instead, as a catalyst for change and with a true intention ‘to serve’, the PeopleOps Scrum Master set aside 2 hours every day to work herself on the project. 
  • For employees who were busy at the construction site and could not fill the necessary forms, the PeopleOps Scrum Master elicited stewardship behavior to address the impediment. On their behalf, she filled the forms by taking the details over phone. The PeopleOps Scrum Master shared the soft copy of the duly filled form to the employees through e-mail and WhatsApp. She asked the employees to make necessary corrections, sign the documents and send it to her in a day’s time. She ensured that this activity was completed before her team could join her in the project. 

Facilitator and Mentor 

  • The HR team (HR Executive and Recruiter) joined the project after 10 days. Both didn’t have any prior experience in employees file management. As a mentor, the PeopleOps Scrum Master explicated the importance of file documentation and management to the team. She provided the necessary guidance on how the process should be followed, including soft copies preparation and saving them in employees’ database. As a facilitator, the PeopleOps Scrum Master promoted collaboration and enabled the team to achieve their project objectives. 

Outcomes 

The entire documentation of the employees was completed within the stipulated time (20 days). An internal audit was conducted by both the financial and quality teams, followed by an external audit. There were zero errors in the whole process.

The HR team (PeopleOps Scrum Master, HR Executive, and Recruiter) received accolades, a team reward of INR 5000, and a half-day off from the company’s Managing Director. The team spent the reward amount toward team lunch and sweets for all employees. 

Conclusion:

The PeopleOps Scrum Master, aka HR Manager applied multiple stances based on the context and situation, and helped the project to be successful. The team learnt that where there is a will to accomplish objectives and tasks, there is a way to fulfill them without hampering the daily activities. 

Author: Kalyani Pantangi

Edited by: V Lakshmi Chirravuri

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One Metric that Matters – Part II

Measuring the Progress of Transformation

If you’ve ever seen a Transformers movie, you’re well aware that one of the bots transforms, even if it’s in smooth (if not longer) action. The pieces and features melt away to reveal something new, but there are similar parts involved. Any change happens when organizations change.

In Part 1 of this two-part post, we discussed measuring specific metrics at each stage of a product’s lifecycle. We introduced the One Metric That Matters (OMTM) framework that helps identify a single measurement to gauge a product’s success in a given stage of development, cutting noise from the signal. Useful, right?

So how can we take this approach to enterprise transformation, especially in the HR space where metrics are everywhere but don’t always exemplify the success of a team of people? If leveraging the Agile PeopleOps Framework, there is a charter that captures the change to be made. We recommend using this approach to identify OMTM metrics and specify them in stages.
For starters, let’s revisit Steve Glaveski’s table, with People Team-transformation additions:

Taking these metrics, and documenting and tracking your use of the charter, will help your APF change stay the course. It’s a great coaching tool for leadership (example: “What can we do better here?”), but it’s also a great live document for the people you’re working directly with (it tracks progress). Can do). A great way to do it). A great way to track and track your progress). Helps to show.)

Give it a try and let us know what you think! If you have questions about this approach, find us at info@agilepeopleopsframework.com

Author: Christopher Goscinski

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What is Agile Method and How It Works

If you are reading this, it is highy likely that you are familiar with the Agile method in software development.

You know about Scream, Kanban, SAFE. You are familiar with how to work in these ways, and they not only deliver value to organizations but also benefit the teams.

You recognize the value inherent in iterative development, and collaborative environments.

Agile has taken the business world by storm: engineering teams continue to accelerate adoption (12th State of Agile Report).

And the values and principles behind the Agile Manifesto are evolving to meet the needs of other business functions.

Agile in HR isn’t particularly new – plenty has been written to date about why HR would benefit from such a framework.

And yet, there hasn’t been a very good answer as to how Agile values can be tactically brought into an HR organization.

Enter the Agile PeopleOps Framework (APF). APF enables HR teams to intentionally adopt a more Agile mindset.

It shifts from a worldview of VUCA to one of flexibility, responsiveness, and transparency.

The APF has borrowed much from the structure of the Agile Manifesto to bring a new list of values and priorities directly in line with the HR business function.

A Tale of Two Manifesto

Mirroring the structure of a Scrum Team (and at scale, a program team), APF focuses on human capital strategy, and intentional talent acquisition.

It is a full-service framework, accounting for COPs, KPIs (now called Human Effectivity Indicators – or HEIs), and end-to-end value delivery (from Talent Acquisition to the long-term employee.)

Roles and processes are similar to Scrum, and the underlying feel of adoption is not unlike that of software development.

If your organization has adopted an agile approach within its engineering teams, consider APF as part of your organization’s journey.

There is, of course, a lot to unpack here. Values, principles, roles, and processes differ slightly from that of their traditional Agile counterparts.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll discuss some of these changes in greater depth. We’ll detail how the APF Agile HR Manifesto differs from that of the Agile Manifesto.

We’ll discuss where we believe Agile (as a mindset) is heading, and why we think Agile is here to stay, albeit in various forms.

Also peek into the processes that drive APF – diving into the customizations of Scrum and Kanban that were made in response to different environments and goals.

Finally, we’ll look further and talk about what it means to be culturally agile, and how to get there.

A fair warning: this is Systems Thinking-type stuff. Get ready to think big!

We’re excited to introduce APF, and we think you’ll begin to find value from Day 1 of adoption.

Connect with us at info@agilepeopleopsframework.com to learn more about APF.

Our PeopleOps Coaches offer 1:1 coaching, and other services to help you get started on your journey (or to help accelerate!)

Author: Christopher Goscinski